Voyagers

SciFi/Fantasy , Suspense/Thriller | 108 Minutes

Nationwide: Friday, April 09, 2021

Lionsgate

PG

for violence, some strong sexuality, bloody images, a sexual assault and brief strong language

With the future of the human race at stake, a group of young men and women, bred for intelligence and obedience, embark on an expedition to colonize a distant planet. But when they uncover disturbing secrets about the mission, they defy their training and begin to explore their most primitive natures. As life on the ship descends into chaos, they're consumed by fear, lust, and the insatiable hunger for power.
 
 
 
 
 

Cast & Crew

Movie Cast
 
  • Tye Sheridan
    Cast
     
  • Lily-Rose Depp
    Cast
     
  • Fionn Whitehead
    Cast
     
  • Colin Farrell
    Cast
     
  • Chante Adams
    Cast
     
  • Isaac Hempstead Wright
    Cast
     
  • Viveik Kalra
    Cast
     
  • Archie Madekwe
    Cast
     
  • Quintessa Swindell
    Cast
     
  • Madison Hu
    Cast
     
Movie Crew
 
  • Neil Burger
    Director
     
  • Brendon Boyea
    Producer
     
  • Neil Burger
    Producer
     
  • Neil Burger
    Writer
     
  • Basil Iwanyk
    Producer
     
 

User Reviews

Public Reviews - 1 Reviews
 
  • Gregory M. - Rated it 4 out of 5

    "Voyagers" With the future of the human race at stake, Christopher (Tye Sheridan), Sela (Lily-Rose Depp), Zac (Fionn Whitehead), Richard (Colin Farrell), Edward (Isaac Hempstead Wright), Kai (Archie Madekwe), Phoebe (Chanté Adams) and Julie (Quintessa Swindell), a group of young men and women, bred for intelligence and obedience, embark on an expedition to colonize a distant planet. But when they uncover disturbing secrets about the mission, they defy their training and begin to explore their most primitive natures. As life on the ship descends into chaos, they’re consumed by fear, ****, and the insatiable hunger for power. A group of young people sitting around inside a spaceship. In the beginning, the actions of the crew are supposed to have a kind of a military precision because they're, quite literally, work machines. They're there to work on the ship, keep it going, do repairs, and take care of everything that needs to be taken care of. They're disheveled, zoned out, and looking like predators resting after a hunt. Christopher is the first among the young crew to sense that something is off about their life on the ship. At first, Christopher can’t quite define what’s troubling him about life on the ship, and so he acts out in a defiant and rebellious way. He has an instinctive moral sense, a goodness, but he starts to abandon that and give into his selfish urges. Christopher really wants to get at the truth about the mission, and about his role in it. He’s the vehicle for the film’s central theme of the back-and-forth between our good and not-so-good impulses. He bonds with another young and gifted crewperson, Sela, who serves as the chief medical officer. Sela is striving to connect and understand the fundamental questions of what it means to be human; where do we come from? Where are we going? Why are we here? It's a challenging role, requiring a soulfulness and, at least in the beginning, a repressed emotionality, until Sela discovers a transformative inner strength. She's intent on pursuing her humanity, and to experience an authentic human connection. Still, the attention Sela receives from Christopher and another crew member, Zac, initially leaves her a little lost. Zac is really aggressive towards her, and then Christopher comes along, and it’s all kind of jarring for Sela. But she quickly comes to understand that she and Zac are definitely not on the same wavelength. So, their two sides of this triangle represent the good and dark sides of our nature, as well as the way she’s grappling with that. Zac and Christopher are close friends, at least at first. They’re kindred spirits. Zac and Christopher make a stunning find that gives him considerable power over most of the crew, and once Zac has that he’s never coming back. He's probably a lot more fun to have a beer with than Christopher, and most of his crewmates are willing to do some stupid things with him because he looks like he’s having a great time. Christopher and Zac uncover one of the mission’s most startling secrets; that they and the rest of the crew have been unknowingly drugged with a medication they call, 'The Blue'. The crew had been told it's a vitamin supplement, but in reality, it serves to suppress their emotions, including anger, fear, desire, everything that makes us human. The mission planners have prepared for everything, including the potential rebelliousness of this crew, so they’ve arranged to have them on medication to keep them calm and docile. It also keeps their sex-drive in check because they’re supposed to reproduce at a specific time in their journey; and until that time comes, they're on 'The Blue'. Christopher hacks into the ship’s computer system and discovers the true purpose of this medicating azure liquid. He and Zac lead the way and convince most of their shipmates to go off 'The Blue', and for the first time, they begin to realize what it really is to feel, to be alive as a young person experiencing freedom and sensuality. Once they go off 'The Blue', they're overwhelmed by all of these feelings, desires, and energy than they've ever experienced. Zac gets off 'The Blue' and he wants instant pleasure, quick-hits, whether it's food or sex. He becomes fixated with Sela and begins pursuing her. He’s now all about instant gratification, but, actually, he’s always been wired for that. Zac and some of the crew have decided it doesn’t matter at all. They want to do what they want, when they want, no matter the cost to anyone else. Others try to maintain a sense of order, of right and wrong. It all raises questions about how a society can function; about selfishness and self-sacrifice. That’s the foundation of the conflict. Christopher and Zac keep their discovery a secret from the only member of the crew over the age of 30, Richard, a selfless scientist who has raised the group since birth. Though he was not supposed to join them on the mission, Richard’s devotion to his young charges leads him to make the 80-year-voyage; knowing he’ll perish long before they reach their destination. But the discovery of the true nature of 'The Blue' will ultimately seal Richard’s fate long before he had planned. Like any parent, Richard wants to protect his kids, and as they move out of adolescence into young adulthood, protection seems to become overprotection. Richard believes in the mission, but he also knows there’s a problem, a secret at the heart of it. So he’s torn because he must conceal that secret from these kids who he’s so devoted to. And they sense Richard is hiding something, and even though he’s given everything to them, they begin to mistrust him. Richard is a father figure and somebody who was always there to corral, guide, monitor, and care for those kids; from birth into young adulthood. Among a ship’s crew comprised of the stunningly gifted, perhaps the smartest one aboard is Edward, a control ingénieur. Edward is also a bit of a loner and lacks social skills. But he's brilliant, and he uses that to find evidence of an alien force that's thought to be living on the ship’s exterior. Slowly, word gets out about Edward’s discovery, and a toxic fear begins to rip through the crew. Edward is driven by data, and even when things start falling apart and go a bit crazy on the ship, he remains focused on the information he can collect about it. Kai is mysterious and sullen, and is a lot like Zac. Kai pushes Zac to do something horrible but doesn’t take the rap for it. He’s constantly egging on Zac and always gets what he wants. Phoebe, is as impressively intelligent as Edward, but more focused on the well-being of the crew and of the mission. She’s all brain and likes everything done by the book. Phoebe believes in logic and reason. If something doesn’t have evidence behind it, then she doesn’t believe it exists. Julie is an engineer who chooses to ignore the increasing chaos and rebellion aboard ship because, well, she can. Julie decides to act on none of the events surrounding her because she doesn’t want to drop into that consciousness. Even when things start getting crazy, she’s like, 'I’ll do whatever I want'. The suspense is excruciating as you watch these young men and women trying to cope under the most extreme circumstances. They’re trapped in this ship, all moral order has broken down, and somehow they must figure out how to survive this ordeal. It's a wild ride. What does it feel like, to feel for the first time? What happens when our innermost nature, after being long suppressed, is finally unleashed? Those are some of the provocative themes explored, within the context of a space epic, in "Voyagers". The story is about human nature in a vacuum, and the ship is a sterile environment where the young crew almost seem like laboratory rats. We watch to see how they behave under these conditions, how they quickly descend into savagery. And we wonder, is this who we're at our core? It’s about a group of extraordinary young people waking up to sensual desires, to freedom, to power, and the thrilling euphoria that goes with that experience. A talented group of young people who con embody the unusual personalities that find themselves on the ship, who reflect the essential conflict of human nature, and who can wrestle with these powerful impulses. The ship is a metaphor for our world, the human race like the ship’s crew, hurtling through space, not exactly sure why we’re here or where we’re going, but having to make a meaningful life regardless. These tight interiors are built to stoke the character's isolation, confinement and cabin fever. And it’s about how some of the crew exploit fear for their own ends, how they fan the flames of it, and then present themselves as the saviors. The film creates a world that’s visually striking while providing an opportunity to really dig in and put a magnifying glass to each of the characters. The story’s multi-generational mission in search of a new home descends into madness, as the crew reverts to its most primal state, not knowing if the real threat they face is what's outside the ship or who they're becoming inside it. It’s a bold, experiential, and genre-defining motion picture event about living beyond the edge, and the delicate balance between control and chaos, subservience and dominance, numb versus switched-on, and order versus rebellion. "Voyagers" isn’t a fantasy. The spacecraft is purely utilitarian and functional and based on actual proposals within 'NASA' and other organizations studying space travel outside our solar system. The movie asks the moral question, why should we be good? If we’re all going to die in the end anyway, what does it matter whether we’re good or not? written by Gregory Mann
 

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